Self-control is very difficult with Impulse Control Disorder

There are things my son says and does that are out of his control. I only wish more people would be understanding of this, especially people that he is around almost daily. Not only is he living with Tourette Syndrome, he is also struggling with other underlying disorders, one of which is Impulse Control Disorder.

Within his impulse control, he may say things at the wrong time or make a joke at the wrong time. Inside his mind, these are totally acceptable. He may call someone a name — “stupid” or “idiot” — and not realize that it is going to hurt their feelings. He may burst out with anger saying things that are really offensive toward those he loves and later apologize because he realized his actions have hurt someone.

He has a lot of anger built up every day, and he has no idea how to deal with it other than letting it out. He has gotten so much better at releasing it through stress exercise; however, nobody is perfect. So I ask that, if anyone who is around a child like Kane hears this, or sees the rage, please understand nobody but that child knows what is going on inside.

I love my little stinker to the moon and back! 

Why one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to ADHD

There’s often a pattern when it comes to the many different treatments of ADHD. Each one shows improvement in some children, but not in all. Each treatment needs to be carefully regulated by parents and pediatricians to make sure none of the treatments overlap in a way that could be dangerous to the child. Some of these treatments target specific symptoms of ADHD, but not the others.

These precautions, in conjunction with the different forms of ADHD, mean one thing: there is no one “cure” for ADHD because there is no one expression of ADHD. Each child’s treatment will depend on all sorts of factors such as:

  • Type of ADHD
  • Health
  • Allergies
  • Learning Style
  • Other Disabilities
  • Safety at Home
  • Good Nutrition

And this list is by no means exclusive. My point is that it’s not fair for parents to be judged for not trying a new “miracle cure.” The children I’ve worked with in different schools and in tutoring generally thrive under multiple sources of assistance. Some of the management strategies may surprise you, too. Most benefit from a mix of medication, a balanced diet, and these non-medical treatment sources:

  • Exercise – In the article, “Taking Away Recess Bad for ADHD Kids, Experts Say,” Thomas Lenz, an associate pharmacy professor at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska,  says that exercise and ADHD medications act on the brain in very similar ways. In addition, according to NOVA’s article, “The Science of Smart: A Surprising Way To Improve Executive Function,” exercise is one of the best ways to improve executive function struggles, a symptom most children with ADHD struggle with.
  • An Organized Home – Children with ADHD often struggle to pick up basic organizational skills and habits such as having one spot for homework or knowing how to follow a basic evening routine. ADDitude Magazine’s article, “Help Your ADHD Child Organize Homework,” stresses that it’s important for parents to work with their children to develop healthy organizational skills as they grow so they’re more prepared to carry those skills into the world with them.
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) – CBT is often an effective treatment for individuals with OCD, but experts are finding that it can be helpful for children with ADHD as well. U.S. News Health’s article,  “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help With ADHD,” says, “CBT for children with ADHD is aimed largely at improving their behavior through praise and rewards that motivate them to calm down enough to cope with school or other challenges.” The article states that while CBT won’t cure ADHD, it helps children learn thinking and self-management skills. If mastered, these skills can last far beyond any medication.

Different Kids, Different Needs

Parenting a child with ADHD is not an easy task by any means. It’s time consuming all the time, and it takes a lot of trial and error. A certain diet and medication that works for one child will probably not work for the next. And on top of that, children’s dosages and treatments will need to constantly change as their bodies and brains grow.

If you’re the parent of a child with ADHD, don’t let people guilt you into only one form of management for your child. No matter how much they promise you “just need this one treatment,” odds are that your child will have his or her own needs that are mixed and multifaceted. The best you can do is try, and when one treatment doesn’t work, don’t consider yourself a failure. Simply move on to the next and know that you’re doing your best. Your attempts to meet your children’s needs will encourage his or her teachers and other supporting adults to do the same, and as a team, you’re giving your kiddo the best chance he’s got. And isn’t that what every parent wants?

Do you have experience with ADHD management? What are you thoughts on the issue? What was successful for your, or what wasn’t? Please share your thoughts in the Comment Box below. And don’t forget, you can sign up for my newsletter for extra resources on neurological disorders, education, and spiritual encouragement. As always, thanks for reading!

Tourette Syndrome + OCD was exhausting & difficult

It was more than 23 years ago that I was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome.

I’ve learned a lot in that time. About myself, about others and most of all, that our relationship with mental health and conditions like TS is far more challenging than it should be.

My parents had a lot on their plate, jobs, managing a household, raising 3 children (one with considerable special needs), when I started developing some unfamiliar behaviours. A reoccurring urge to violently shake my head was one that began to frighten them. I once became so distracted with this urge that I stopped my bicycle in the middle of the road to indulge, without paying attention to the flow of cars around me. Sometime after that we began seeing doctors and specialists and figuring out what was going on.

Tourette Syndrome is a neurological condition that essentially causes repeated involuntary movements and sounds that are referred to as “tics”. It affects everyone differently, and contrary to what you may have seen in movies, most persons affected by it do not swear uncontrollably.

Tourette Syndrome was something seemingly unknown to most people and there was lots of learning for all of us to do. What was most challenging for me wasn’t necessarily my life at home or these urges (“tics”). It wasn’t that I had to live with them that caused me the most trouble, it was that I was expected to live a normal life in a world that wasn’t always going to just let it happen.

From experience, I quickly knew that each time I gave in to my tics, someone was going to notice. I knew that each time someone noticed, they were going to make choices. Were they going to pretend nothing happened? Were they going to exploit the opportunity to make a spectacle of it and lead others in a chorus of teasing and diminishment of my character? Or were they going to simply get “weirded out” and lose trust in even being near me?

Naturally, thinking about all of these things stressed me out and just fuelled more of a need to indulge my tics. Trying to hide and suppress them took a lot of energy. During the worst of it, there were probably days where I spent most of my time managing these expectations and very little on school work, engaging with friends or anything else until I finally had a moment of privacy. I was usually too exhausted to do a whole lot with those moments.

As I’ve written before, there were other things also happening to make my childhood difficult in ways that probably interacted with or exasperated this condition.

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52 Weeks of TS: Week 43

EDITOR’S NOTE: Every Tuesday, noted Tourette Syndrome advocate Troye Evers shares his “52 Weeks of TS” blog journal with the TSParentsOnline community. With just 9 weeks remaining in this series, there’s a chance you missed one more entries from his exciting, revealing journey. You can read all of them here. For more information about Troye, please click on his name or visit his website.

This week has been a bit of a stressful week. Now remember there is a difference between stress and anxiety. My anxiety is still at an all-time low, but we are always going to deal with the everyday stress that life brings us. I’ve been planning a big book release/signing party for my book “A Day in the Life of Tourette Syndrome.” This event is going to be a big event, with approximately 150 people, and just finalizing all the plans and making sure there are enough books for everyone is stressing me out a bit. I think the excitement of the situation is also adding to the stress factor.

It has been an interesting week looking into myself and my anxiety. I know that different medications and supplements work differently on different people, but I do have to say, I’m really believing that the fish oil has helped with the anxiety. The anxiety plagued me 24/7, but all of a sudden, it’s gone. My unwanted neighbor, anxiety, has been evicted.

I do wonder if it is the fish oil, or maybe even the waxing and waning of TS, but I’m going to go with the fish oil. I have been on quite a few medications for the anxiety, including Klonopin, for the past six years. This week I actually reached a point of wanting to cut out the Klonopin. I have been on Klonopin for the past six years, with no real relief at all.

Upping the dosage, lowering the dosage, changing the times of when I took the pill, and nothing helped. The anxiety was still there, but two weeks of taking fish oil, I miraculously notice a difference. I’m going to see my doctor next week and talk to him about getting off the Klonopin permanently, or at least for the time being.

The anxiety might be gone, but the tics and the OCD are still there.

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No single fix for ADHD

No Single Fix for ADHD

One of the phrases that grates on me the most is, “if you would only,” when it comes to parenting children with disorders, particularly. Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders in the United States, so there are no lack of opinions on how to “fix” it. Healthline’s article, “ADHD by the Numbers: Facts, Statistics, and You,” says that as of September 2014, there were 6.4 million American children, ages 4-17, who have been diagnosed with ADHD.

A lot of people are theorizing why there’s been such a rise in the numbers within the last few decades. While I personally believe the numbers reflect multiple modern diet, exercise, education, and lifestyle trends, I’m not going to get into that today. As an educator, my job isn’t to research the scientific reasons for children’s struggle; my job is to address them here and now. And believe me, that’s enough of a job on its own.

Addressing ADHD is rarely an easy task. ADHD doesn’t mean a child is “bad,” but it does mean his problems will be unique to him. While there are symptoms that flag ADHD, such as the inability to focus on one thing at a time, emotional regulation struggles, sudden outbursts, and problems with executive function, no two children have the exact same version of the disorder. Unlike treating the flu, ADHD is complex because the brain is complex.

WebMD’s article, “Types of ADHD: Making the Diagnosis,” discusses the different kinds of ADHD. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the American Psychiatric Association has grouped ADHD types into three main groups:

  1. Combined – The child struggles with both hyperactivity and inattention
  2. Predominantly Inattentive – The child struggles most with the inability to focus on one thing at a time (commonly known as ADD: Attention Deficit Disorder)
  3. Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive – The child struggles most with hyperactivity and impulsiveness, but not as much with the inattentive portion.

The DSM has at least 9 symptoms for the part of the disorder dealing with inattention and 9 more for the part dealing with hyperactivity and impulsiveness. In order for the child to qualify for at that portion of the disorder, she needs to qualify for at least 6 out of the 9 symptoms.

Understandably, this means there are many children who might have 5 out of the 9, which by no means, indicates that they don’t struggle. They just don’t struggle enough for the DSM’s diagnostic requirements. If you do the math, this means there are countless versions of ADHD that can occur. And of course, this is all theoretical because it doesn’t bring into account environmental factors either, such birth complications, a stressful or abusive home environment, food accessibility, or the presence of other comorbid disorders.