NJCTS discusses Tourette Syndrome at Centenary College Abilities Day

HACKETTSTOWN — Spreading awareness of Tourette Syndrome and providing world-class resources is at the heart of the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome’s (NJCTS) mission. This month, NJCTS took part in Abilities Day at Centenary College in Hackettstown.

Myself and volunteer Maddie Pucciarello discussed the programs and services of NJCTS with Centenary students, local teachers and school administrators.

Abilities Day was a wonderful opportunity for us to show students planning to become educators how education outreach provided by NJCTS can help them in their future careers to improve the lives of young students.

During the 150minute presentation, we shared information about NJCTS. Pucciarello, a graduate student in public health at Rutgers University, discussed her experience with Tourette Syndrome and how she became involved with the organization.

Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements or sounds known as tics. As many as 1 in 100 school-aged children show signs of TS, which is frequently accompanied by ADHD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety or learning disabilities.

We are looking forward to returning to Centenary to deliver an in-service presentation for education students on the topic of Tourette Syndrome and its associated disorders.

For more information about Tourette Syndrome the Center and its Education Outreach Program, please visit www.njcts.org or call 908-575-7350.

Graduate students at Montclair State get tutorial on Tourette

On March 23, the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders (NJCTS) held a Graduate Student “Faculty” In-Serivce presentation at Montclair State University. Presented by Dr. Michelle Miller, more than 75 attendees — which included graduate students from the School of Psychology — were given a comprehensive look at Tourette Syndrome, ways to treat it, and ways to accommodate it in and out of the classroom.

The attendees described the presentation as “very informative & comprehensive” and an “excellent presentation with well-displayed, well-paced information.” To schedule one of these presentations at your location, please contact me at 908-575-7350.

Gina Maria Jones, M.Ed.
Education Outreach Coordinator
NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders, Inc.

Rage is really affecting my TS son

Hello, my name is Helen, and I am married and have four sons.  Our first son was diagnosed with TS at the age of 9.  No one in our family has TS that we know of.  We were lucky enough to only have one son with TS.  We were told 50/50 one of our other sons would have it.

Anyway, my son Billy is now 29 years old.  From nine years old till about 16, Billy was on meds.  He decided in high school he didn’t want to take meds cause they made him tired.  Billy, at the same time, started experiencing with marijuana and alcohol.  Billy graduated from HS and got into the school of engineering at Rutgers University after making quite a number of outstanding schools.

Freshman year went fine.  Sophmore year Billy decided to join the engineering fraternity.  His graes declined and he was put on academic probation.  At that time he started dating a girl named Kat.  She was a grade ahead of him and studying psychology.  Their relationship ended after three years because of Billy’s temper and drinking.

Billy then graduated and moved into the city for five years.  He had another girlfriend Tara that last almost three years with lots of fighting and drinking.  Billy has anger issues.  That relationship ended.  Billy decided he wanted out of the city and to buy a house.  He moved into a houser closer to me and my husband.

Billy had some problems with the house but also started dating a new girl named Gabby.  That lasted a few months when she broke it off because of Billy’s anger issues.  Billy came over for dinner Wednesday night and admitted he was depressed and ruined three relationships because of his anger issues.  He realizes he needs to see a TS doctor.  He is in the process of finding one.

My heart goes out to Billy.  I fear of suicide since he has used the term numerous times through the years.  He’s also hating his job at this time.  The word hate is used constantly in his language.  His brothers are afraid of him when he gets angry.  I believe his drinking is out of control and a way of medicating himself.  I have alcoholism in my family and I am very afraid that Billy is succumbing to alcohol.

It breaks my heart to see my son like this and feel like there is nothing I can do but be supportive of him.  Let him know we love him and will be there for him no matter what.  To come to us no matter what he feels.  I hope he finally  takes advantage of the TSA and joins blogs and talk to other people about his issues.  I wish he could only see how bad TS is for others.  His is mild compared to some adults and children.

I just read about “rage” on Facebook and that totally describes what Billy is going through. It is good to know that he can control it, if he puts his mind to it.  Then again, I wish he would stop drinking until he can control his rage.  I look forward to participating in this blog about TS. I should’ve done it years ago instead of sweeping the problem under the rug.

The “perfect” ending to the school year

One of the biggest internal struggles that parents of special needs children face is when…and how far…to “push” your child. Your goals are usually the same as any other child…to be happy, make friends, have others in their lives who love them and treat them well, get through school, and be as independent as possible. How you get them there can be the most complicated part.

One of my best friends is the most successful coach in college gymnastics. One of her many gifts is the ability to motivate and inspire…which doesn’t mean holding your hand…it involves giving you a little kick in the pants at times. In going through our most difficult years with our son, she was one of the only people I talked to about all that was going on here at home.

I was scared, and depressed much of the time…and frankly a lot more unsure of myself and down in the dumps than I had been before…thank you for hanging in there with me! I had young children, all my family lived at least 15 hours away, my husband was busy with a crazy job, and I was a NJ girl living in the south…I didn’t quite fit in. She became my family…my mentor, the voice of reason, and my best friend.

To sum up what I learned from all of my conversations with her…when you have a child that struggles, you can’t focus on the excuses. Your focus has to be on visualizing what they need to accomplish and get to work. For a child who has a health issue, it’s important to start early by educating them on their disorder, their treatment, and how to manage it…from appointments with Drs – to getting out and taking their own medication.

The world is not going to be kind to them at times, and they are going to get knocked down…that’s just a part of life. What children need to learn is how to pick yourself up, dust yourself off and keep moving forward.

Sounds simple…far from it.

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7 strategies for highly successful teens

Vanessa Van Petten is the founder, CEO and lead writer for Radical Parenting.

Hi! Happy New Year! I’m so excited to announce a new life-changing program I have created for teens. In this fun, entertaining and inspirational talk I go over the 7 strategies for highly effective teens. This is nothing like your typical high school presentation. Here are some highlights:

  • Groundbreaking research insights about the teen brain and behavior
  • Hilarious and inspiring videos
  • Immediately applicable action steps to motivate and encourage teens from all levels
  • Relatable stories for teens to feel engaged and understood

I can’t give too much away, but in this talk we delve into both the lighthearted and serious issues teens face including:

  • Effective communication with peers, parents and teachers
  • Mastering the online environment — preventing cyberbullying, staying savvy online and building a digital reputation that lasts
  • School — life balance, reducing stress and finding the right outlets
  • How to have healthy relationships with the important people in a teen’s life
  • Planning for the future, smart college applications, resume building and finding your life passions

I am stoked about this new talk and have already booked out January, February and March at High Schools, youth conferences and Parent groups around the US. Please contact our manager Lynn Campbell for pricing and date availability at manager@radicalparenting.com.

Find out if we might already be coming to your city! And yes, of course, we have tween, parent and teacher versions!