HolisTIC: Magnesium Citrate and Taurine

This post is dedicated to Veronica, who was sweet enough to write me a little note asking me where the heck I have been. She misses me! Hooray! I have missed this site, too. To be honest, I have been kind of a whirling dervish of house work, kids, trying to figure out employment, getting a new job, quitting because my boss was an 84-year old maniac who couldn’t stop screaming about my subject lines “Horseshxt! Superfulous Horsehixt!”, fretting over finances, attempting not to fret over finances and ultimately deciding that my priority for now is to be as present with my kids as possible given that we have a four-month summer coming up.

Yes, let me say that again. FOUR MONTHS.

Here is how I feel about that concept.


Just kidding. It’s more like this.


But that’s okay. I am going to make the most of it. I have finally decided to make my income by concentrating full-time on Ebay and freelance writing. Sounds like a weird mix, but it works.

Writing Clients

Blogging for a surrogacy company – GlobalIVF

Bloggin for a prescription discount company – SimpleRX



Here’s my store. I am figuring out the most efficient ways to list, sell and ship my items. The ultimate goal is less thrift store items and more New with Tag items purchased downtown. I figure if I buy the same item in bulk, I only have to list it once rather than taking a gazillion photos/day. Other than filling orders, I can spend my time taking care of my wee ones and working on my book marketing which leads me to my final two points:

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Happily Ticked Off — The Book, Part 6: Chapter 3

At long last, here is Chapter 3 of my book “Happily Ticked Off” for you to read if you’re interested. I hope to share more with you on this book’s progress, my writing progress and my kid’s crazy life in 2015.

As always, I’d love to hear from you, too!


Chapter 3 — ScholasTIC

Your TS Child (And you, freaked out mama) 

Will Surive Grammar School

Five Years Later

Fourth grade started out like third grade. It had only been three weeks and I’d been stopped by the teacher three times. The first incident was innocuous enough.

“Mrs. Frazer!” Nicky’s teacher, Chris, called to me with a smile.

I internally kicked myself. “All this could have been avoided if I’d picked him up in the carpool line. This thought was quickly replaced with, “Just because you avoid an issue doesn’t make the issue go away. It just prolongs it.”

I had one more thought that went something like, “Stop talking to yourself and pay attention to the teacher- ooooooh, a hummingbird!” at which point I directed my concentration where it belonged. Turns out, if only Nicky had done the same thing, I wouldn’t be standing in the blue door frame of an elementary school room on a Friday afternoon.

“Nicky had a hard time focusing today,” he informed me.

Last year, upon hearing similar words from his third grade teacher, my face dropped like a bad L.A. facelift. I was crushed. Four years into his TS diagnosis, his tics were still pretty minimal. With his penchant for pink umbrellas and impromptu standup routines, I knew he’d never be an academic soldier, dotting his i’s and crossing his t’s with laser like precision. But I was still holding on to the hope that Nicky’s eccentricities wouldn’t mark him as different.

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Happily Ticked Off — The Book, Part 5: Chapter 2

At long last, here is Chapter 2 of my book “Happily Ticked Off” for you to read if you’re interested. I hope to share more with you on this book’s progress, my writing progress and my kid’s crazy life in 2015.

As always, I’d love to hear from you, too!


Chapter 2 — CinemaTIC

Tourette Syndrome – Movie Style!

If Tourettes’ was your movie, what genre would you write? Whatever you choose, be prepared for lots of action, drama, tears and laughter. 

Selling a movie isn’t much different than being handed a Tourette’s diagnosis. Both involve stories of heartfelt love, drama and unpredictability. Most people have a general idea of what might be involved to proceed, but when push comes to shove, no one is really prepared for all the twists and turns.

What path does one take?

What people do you need to speak to?

Do you have to spend a ton of time and money to get great results or is it just one giant crap shoot? And really, like the script itself, is there a happy ending?

It occurs to me that despite big talk about loving the adventure of movies and parenthood, everyone feels the most safe and satisfied when they can count on the big shiny finale. Give us happy bows and Happy Meals. Let us get fat on security and hold a bit tighter to our overpriced gallon sized Diet Cokes through the scary parts, because at the end it’ll be worth it. That theme song will blare and the credits will roll.  Boy that was sure scary there for a while, but look how great it all turned out. And that heroine sure had great hair the entire time – even during the knife fight.

The problem with tics is that you can’t count on that perfect happy ending wrapped up with a bow.  There are millions of ways to manage Tourettes, and with a personal plan, created through trial and error, oftentimes one can suppress the symptoms a good deal, but there is no perfect solution.

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Happily Ticked Off — The Book, Part 4: Chapter 1

At long last, here is Chapter 1 of my book “Happily Ticked Off” for you to read if you’re interested. I hope to share more with you on this book’s progress, my writing progress and my kid’s crazy life in 2015.

As always, I’d love to hear from you, too!


Chapter 1 — UnrealisTIC

Your dreams are not your kid’s dreams. Listen to well meaning educators, even if it’s scary, and trust your instincts. Oh, and get some real friends – the ones that will listen to you cry, make you laugh, and call you on your crap. Trust me on that last part.

I am not the first parent in the world to feel insecure about parenting, nor will I be the last. Special needs or not, giving birth is one big lottery ticket. You are literally making a bargain with the universe that you will do everything in your power to keep your kid safe, to make him strong, to give him values and a sense of self, but at any time he could come down with some devastating illness or get hit by a taco truck. And just like that, all those years of telling him to pick up his socks or shut the fridge to save five cents would be wasted. And you’d never be able to eat Mexican food again.

The above statement sounds so fatalistic. Most people prefer not to even think about it, and who can blame them? It’s scary. It’s unnerving.  And it’s exactly these terrifying fears that drive today’s marketing.

Rich ad execs everywhere are mortgaging their mansions based on Just In Case advertising:  Bank that cord blood just in case your kid comes down with some terminal illness.… Spend the extra hundred and fifty dollars on the Britax car seat just in case you’re hit by an out of control taco truck… Buy the brand name diaper cream just in case your baby’s butt breaks out in hives and ruins your Disney Cruise.  For that matter, book that Disney Cruise whether or not you can afford it just in case your kid grows up to hate you. You can show him, and the grandkids, those pictures of the four of you in Mickey hats coughing up a lung with laughter on the lido deck. Now how could you be a bad parent with proof like that?

Like most people, I wanted the best for my toddler. While I prided myself in not falling prey to every Mommy and Me Groupon that promised to make my son smarter than Einstein, I was also on a pretty strict budget. I couldn’t afford a four hundred dollar car seat or a fancy vacation even if I wanted one. But I did want the best for his education.

As the product of Catholic school myself, I was sure my son would enjoy the same benefits of a private Christian environment – and it was never too early to start. Nicky was three – a year away from his Tourettes diagnosis. As far as I was concerned, his educational career would be nothing but smooth sailing, so why not start him off right?

Against my husband’s wishes on the matter, who figured the local community college co-op would be just fine for our active and friendly tyke, I signed Nicky up for an elite preschool ten miles away. Distance was no barrier to my son’s learning.  He deserved the best.  And that “best” just happened to reside on a campus adjacent to the very grammar school I had attended.

The day I turned in his registration – an intense intake form that was more detailed than his hospital exit papers – I ran into women I hadn’t seen in 20 years. Those freckle faced school girls of my memories had morphed into botoxed 30-something women. Ugg boots replaced saddle shoes.  Flat-ironed hair replaced ponytails and braids. The only thing familiar was the uneasy pit in my stomach.

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NEW BOOK: “Life is Trichy”

“My hair is scattered across my keyboard, desktop, and floor; yet, I need to find a way to continue my typing. I know what this means. This is not a hallucination. This is not a dream. This is not a random actuality. This is something called Trichotillomania.

More strands of hair fall than remain attached. Boredom. A dime-sized region of baldness becomes the diameter of a grapefruit. Fear. Relapse becomes the norm. Disappointment. A classmate finds out and questions a solitary hair spike. Humiliation.

I did not mean to pull out my hair, but I did. I do not know what I was thinking or feeling at the time, but I pulled anyway. I wish I could announce that it was an isolated incident, but it continued….”

LIFE IS TRICHY is the true story of a 29-year-old lifelong perfectionist, who struggled with the mental health disorders of skin picking, nail biting, and hair pulling. Starting from a young age, these behaviors resulted in years spent hiding these body-focused repetitive behaviors from everyone she knew, while simultaneously pursuing a professional career in psychology  – so that one day she could help others with the same exact challenges. She tactfully weaves the actions, feelings, and thoughts from years of sitting in the patient’s seat, with her professional, psychological knowledge in the clinician’s seat.

sD (1 of 1)Author Lindsey Marie Muller’s personal struggle mixes with factual information to elucidate the tricky and unspoken truth about a classification of disorders affecting five percent of the population. Life is Trichy is appropriate for clinicians, patients, family and friends of hair pullers, and curious minds.

Lindsey holds a Master’s degree in Clinical Counseling Psychology, a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology, in addition to three years of doctoral level education. She currently resides in Los Angeles, California where she enjoys the perfect weather, exercising, healthy cooking, sugar-free baking, spas, and meditation. She currently works in private practice.Life is Trichy is her first publication.

Life is Trichy is available in paperback and Kindle format and on sale at www.lifeistrichy.com. A portion of each book sale will be donated to BFRB research.