10 Common Tourette’s Questions & Answers, Part 3

Living with neurological disorders can be full of challenges for both children and adults. The good news is that life with these disorders can still be filled with joy and adventure. It just takes some creative thinking and flexibility to get there, and that’s what I’m here to help with! Visit me on my own site, brittanyfichterwrites.com, if you want to know more!

10 Common Questions and Answers About Tourette Syndrome

Tourette Syndrome, despite all the information we’ve gained in the last 15 years, is still a hard topic to find information on. Unfortunately, the media has chosen to pick out the parts of the disorder that it deems funny, and the rest of the information seems tucked away in textbooks on dusty corners of doctors’ desks.

Well, no more. Here is the third of 10 questions that touch on topics I’ve talked about with parents of children (and individuals) with Tourettes multiple times. You want a quick, easy answer to share with someone who doesn’t understand? Hopefully, I’ll have it right here as part of this series!

In case you missed them, here are links to the first two parts:

Part 1
Part 2

Also, if you want more information about a certain topic, I’ve linked related posts underneath each answer. My related posts will have more sources that you can look up on the topic if you so desire.

Can’t You Just Stop?

Imagine you have a told, the kind where you have that really annoying little cough, the kind that happens every 30 seconds. Now remember what it feels like to try and stop that cough. You might be able to suppress is for an minute, maybe two. But eventually, you’ll have to cough, and when you do, you’re going to have a coughing fit.

That’s exactly what it feels like to suppress ticcing. If I think about it, I can often suppress my tics (The length of time depends on how strong the tics are that day.), but when I’m done, I’m going to pay for it afterward, often when I get home or back in the car. So when people tell children with tics, “Can’t you just stop?!” there’s a good chance they probably can’t.

For more information, see: Tourettes Isn’t Always Obvious: The Hidden Struggle

Tourettes Isn't Always Obvious

10 Common Tourette’s Questions & Answers, Part 2

Living with neurological disorders can be full of challenges for both children and adults. The good news is that life with these disorders can still be filled with joy and adventure. It just takes some creative thinking and flexibility to get there, and that’s what I’m here to help with! Visit me on my own site, brittanyfichterwrites.com, if you want to know more!

10 Common Questions and Answers About Tourette Syndrome

Tourette Syndrome, despite all the information we’ve gained in the last 15 years, is still a hard topic to find information on. Unfortunately, the media has chosen to pick out the parts of the disorder that it deems funny, and the rest of the information seems tucked away in textbooks on dusty corners of doctors’ desks.

Well, no more. Here is the second of 10 questions that touch on topics I’ve talked about with parents of children (and individuals) with Tourettes multiple times. You want a quick, easy answer to share with someone who doesn’t understand? Hopefully, I’ll have it right here as part of this series!

In case you missed it, here is part 1.

Also, if you want more information about a certain topic, I’ve linked related posts underneath each answer. My related posts will have more sources that you can look up on the topic if you so desire.

Is Tourettes About Cussing?

Despite the picture the media paints of typical Tourette Syndrome it’s estimated that only 5 to 15 percent of people with Tourette Syndrome have Coprolalia, or the version of Tourette Syndrome that involves cursing, according to the Counsellng Directory article, Tourette’s syndrome.

For more information, see: Busting 5 Myths About Tourette’s Syndrome

Busting5mythsabouttourettessyndrome

52 Weeks of TS: Week 12

EDITOR’S NOTE: Every Tuesday, noted Tourette Syndrome advocate Troye Evers shares his “52 Weeks of TS” blog journal with the TSParentsOnline community. In cased you missed the first 11 weeks, you can read them here. For more information about Troye, please click on his name or visit his website.

Hey world, get off the phone!! Technology is killing me. I witnessed a scuffle between two people on the street, because they both ran into each other because they were too busy on their phones. Walking around NYC, you see a majority of the people texting, or talking on their phones. You can even catch someone actually on his or her computer.

I’m not sure how to link this with my TS, but I’m sure I can. People drive me crazy. Is it my social anxiety, my OCD or a mix of both? I hate walking down the sidewalk, trying to dodge all the people on their cell phones that are not paying attention to the world around them. Do they really think this is socially acceptable? Where has technology taken us?

I’m not sure if it is my TS, but when I was younger, I had a thing with numbers. I had a little bit of a photographic memory, now I feel like we’re all turning to some type of technology to do anything in our lives. I don’t know anyone’s phone number except my husbands. Now all we do is press a name and it automatically dials for us.

To this day, I still remember my child hood phone number, grandmother’s phone number, aunt and uncle’s phone number, but now I have to look in my phone to give someone my work number. It’s sad what we have turned into, and who knows where the next step is going to take us.

I suppose I’m fine with most technology as long as it stops slowing the world down and making me late. That’s one of my big things, I hate being late, and I hate waiting. So when people are slowly walking down the sidewalk and not paying attention, there’re making me late. My head goes crazy with these thoughts, even though, for example, I’m never late for work. In fact, I’m usually there 15 to 30 minutes early, left outside waiting for someone who has keys to arrive.

I sit there waiting and the OCD sets in. I stare at the windows of the building across the street while I wait and think, are there people looking out those windows at me? Do they see me ticcing? Do the people in the cars, driving by, see me ticcing. I do this every day before work, and I don’t know why. I know the person with the keys is going to be late, she’s been late every day for the five years I’ve worked there, but I just can’t be late.

I still suppress my tics at work as much as I can. Everyone knows I have TS, but I only really talk about the extent of it with a few people.

Continue reading

10 Common Tourette’s Questions & Answers, Part 1

Living with neurological disorders can be full of challenges for both children and adults. The good news is that life with these disorders can still be filled with joy and adventure. It just takes some creative thinking and flexibility to get there, and that’s what I’m here to help with! Visit me on my own site, brittanyfichterwrites.com, if you want to know more!

10 Common Questions and Answers About Tourette Syndrome

Tourette Syndrome, despite all the information we’ve gained in the last 15 years, is still a hard topic to find information on. Unfortunately, the media has chosen to pick out the parts of the disorder that it deems funny, and the rest of the information seems tucked away in textbooks on dusty corners of doctors’ desks.

Well, no more. Here is the first of 10 questions that touch on topics I’ve talked about with parents of children (and individuals) with Tourettes multiple times. You want a quick, easy answer to share with someone who doesn’t understand? Hopefully, I’ll have it right here as part of this series!

Also, if you want more information about a certain topic, I’ve linked related posts underneath each answer. My related posts will have more sources that you can look up on the topic if you so desire.

What Are Tics in Tourette Syndrome? Are they Bugs?

No, the bug version is spelled, “T-I-C-K.” Tics that are found in Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders are defined as, “sudden twitches, movements, or sounds that people do repeatedly,” by the Center of Disease Control’s article, Facts About Tourette Syndrome. Tics can increase or decrease, and are often exacerbated by heightened stress levels, physical injuries, illness, or even seeing other people tic.

Because Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder, it’s probable that tics originate in the brain. According to the National Institutes of of Health article, Basal ganglia dysfunction in Tourette’s syndrome: a new hypothesis, Tourettes hypothesized to involve in the Basal Ganglia portion of the brain.

For more information, see: What is Tourette Syndrome?

Tourette Spectrum

Help make workplaces TS-friendly!

Many people tell the Tourette Syndrome Foundation of Canada (TSFC) that they are concerned about workplace discrimination. We are too! The TSFC is committed to advocating for appropriate, improved and respectful treatment of people with TS in the workplace.

The first step in improving workplace conditions and reducing workplace discrimination is gathering information. We need to learn about what is happening in workplaces right now and what has happened in workplaces in the past.

To do this, the TSFC has joined forces with York University to create an anonymous, short, easy-to-use e-survey about what is like to have TS and work. This is where you come in.

We need your help in getting this survey filled out by as many people as possible. Every time someone fills out the online survey, the TSFC’s ability to advocate for positive change grows stronger.

Help make sure that the rights of people with TS in the workplace are protected! It only takes a few minutes of your time! If you are 18 years or old, have TS and are either working or have worked in the past, please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/tourettesurvey

And if you know someone with TS who is 18+ and has work experience, please share the link with them. Together we can create an empowered community in an inclusive Canada.