NJCTS Youth Advocate featured on ABC’s “Protect Our Children” special

PROTECT_OUR_CHILDREN_Date Time WABCOn April 16th, ABC aired the, “PROTECT OUR CHILDREN: COPING, STRESS, & MOVING FORWARD” special hosted by Eyewitness News Anchor, Diana Williams. This special describes what experts are referring to as an epidemic of stress-related problems plaguing our children. It’s not easy being a kid these days and the American Psychological Association says one in three teens is stressed. Doctors report they are treating kids as young as six for Migraines and Ulcers. NJCTS Youth Advocate Tom Licato of South Plainfield, NJ, was featured in the program along with other young people dealing with physical, mental, and economic stress-related problems.

“Meeting a 17 year old High School Junior on a mission to educate others about Tourette Syndrome, he’s clearly a leader and a powerful advocate,” said the special’s producer, Jeelu Billimoria. “Finally being diagnosed in 6th grade was a relief for him and he continues to be treated at Overlook Medical Center’s Neuroscience Institute.”

Click here to watch one of NJCTS’s finest advocates on ABC.

 

Youth Advocate Tess speaks to doctors at Hunterdon Medical Center

Last week, NJCTS Youth Advocate Tess Kowalski and NJCTS partner doctor Harvey Bennett, MD, Goryeb Children’s Hospital, engaged the doctors at Hunterdon Medical Center with a powerful Grand Rounds presentation. After Dr. Bennett gave an overview of Tourette Syndrome and the associated disorders from a medical perspective, Tess and her father, Tim, shared their personal experiences with TS.

Tess and other NJCTS Youth Advocates like her are helping the medical community deepen their understanding of the needs of patients with TS and their families. Way to go, Tess!

DSC_0184 DSC_0195 DSC_0196 DSC_0197sm

Tess and Paige are on a roll!

NJCTS Youth Advocates Tess and Paige Kowalski have been on a roll lately. In addition to their presentation at Hamilton Primary School they also presented to the 6th grade class at Temple Emanu-El in Westfield, NJ this week. They educated approximately 50 students and 2 instructors about Tourette Syndrome and the associated disorders and shared their TS stories. Brava, ladies!

Tess and Paige educate Temple Emanu-El about Tourette Syndrome

Tess and Paige educate Temple Emanu-El about Tourette Syndrome and the associated disorders

Some of the factors that cause tics to increase

Some of the factors that cause tics to increase

Tess and Paige show a clip of "I Have Tourette's but Tourette's Doesn't Have Me"

Tess and Paige show a clip of “I Have Tourette’s but Tourette’s Doesn’t Have Me”

IMG_1610

Tess and Paige lead the group in an exercise to help them understand what it can be like living with TS.

Tess and Paige lead the group in an exercise to help them understand what it can be like living with TS.

Tess and Paige take questions from the class.

Tess and Paige take questions from the class.

NJCTS Youth Advocates educate students at Hamilton Primary School about TS

Earlier this week, NJCTS Youth Advocates Tess and Paige Kowalski were joined by Youth Advocate-in-training Cami Jimenez to present to the third graders at Hamilton Primary School in Bridgewater, NJ. More than 115 students learned about Tourette Syndrome, acceptance, and treating others with respect. After school that same day, Education Outreach Coordinator Gina Maria Jones presented to 50 faculty and staff members. Now, the Hamilton School community has the tools to help kids with TS thrive. Way to go, ladies!

Paige and Tess discuss what causes tics to become worse.

Paige and Tess discuss what causes tics to become worse.

Paige and Tess share their TS stories.

Paige and Tess share their TS stories.

Cami, Paige, and Tess take questions from the third graders.

Cami, Paige, and Tess take questions from the third graders.

NJCTS Education Outreach Coordinator Gina Maria Jones looks on as the Youth Advocates answer questions.

NJCTS Education Outreach Coordinator Gina Maria Jones looks on as the Youth Advocates answer questions.

 

Research project: Looking for participants to count their tics

My name is Rebecca and I am a 7th grade student at St. Gregory the Great Academy in Hamilton, New Jersey. Every year, I am required to submit a science experiment to the Mercer County Science and Engineering Fair. This year, I have decided to conduct my research on Tourette Syndrome. I have been diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome since I was nine years old and I have a high level of interest in understanding more about the disorder. Many organizations, including: NJCTS, Camp Twitch and Shout, the Rutgers University Tourette Syndrome Clinic and my private doctors and psychologists, have been a tremendous help to me and my family in coping with my Tourette Syndrome. I have learned to accept my tics and to be proud of myself and my accomplishments. I am so much more than a kid with Tourette Syndrome. I am also a great student, a competitive swimmer, an avid reader and a lot of fun to be around!

Right now, I am asking for help with my research on Tourette Syndrome. I am looking for participants with Tourette Syndrome to count their tics for me. My hypothesis is that students with Tourette Syndrome will have an increase in tics after school. I need volunteers who are willing to count their tics for 30 minutes on 3 school days and 3 non-school days. My experiment is due on January 11, 2016, so I am hoping to collect all of my data by the end of December.  

Here’s what you need to participate: A permission form and an explanation of the procedure and a data collection table. Please contact me at 609-647-6051 or dheimowitz@gmail.com if you have any questions.