Tourette’s keeps fighting!

I haven’t written a post on here for an absurdly long time. I think that’s because everything was sort of just going quite well, and my tics had been really on the down low for ages. Quite frankly, there were no incidents to spark the inspiration for a post.

Now the fact that I am here again shows that nothing lasts forever, and my tics for the last week have been worse than I ever remember them being, even before I was on tablets! Quite annoyingly this happened as I was talking to some friends and said, “Yeah, my tics have been really quiet recently. It’s great!”

Tourette’s clearly didn’t want to be forgotten about, so two days later in a (tutor-less) drama tutorial I was twitching badly, hitting myself in the throat and saying my new constant vocal tic: “Achoo!”. But then, out of nowhere, I dropped the f-bomb. I didn’t know what to do. My group giggled, and I did initially because it was odd, and I don’t have coprolalia but this incident begged to differ.

Later on our tutor actually came to try and offer us some guidance, and I was still ticcing away, not subtly punching myself in the neck or face, and again accidentally swore. My tutor then just said “Language!” in a condescending, exasperated tone. And that was that.

I left the tutorial (luckily I had been leading them outside where I drama group wanted our performance to start with another girl, so she stayed and I ran away) and was left as a mess if tears wondering what on earth I was going to do.

Luckily for me, the small group I am working with for drama are absolutely lovely and gave me hugs and made sure I was OK (one even went with me to sit in a toilet while I calmed down), and they all seemed completely baffled that a tutor that I have had for over a year could even consider saying that to me. Continue reading

2013 NJCTS Children’s Scholarship Award Essay: “TS has Shaped My Life”

This is the essay I submitted to the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders (NJCTS) for their 2013 Children’s Scholarship Award contest. I hope you enjoy it! And here is my profile on the NJCTS website.

Fleischman, EmilyI was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder when I was 6 years old. As I got older, I tried to control my “tics” because I was embarrassed and afraid someone would make fun of me. I would try to hold my tics in all day long while at school and couldn’t wait until I got home so I could tick all I wanted.

Similarly, I rarely went on play dates after school because I wanted to go home so I could tic, and I never went on sleepovers because of the same reasons.

I continued to try and hide the “real me” until my freshman year in high school, when my doctor suggested I tell a few close friends about my TS and OCD. She related it to diabetes — a problem that you cannot control. I was hesitant about the idea and not convinced that it was OK, normal, cool or any combination of those words to have Tourette Syndrome — until my mother and I came across the NJCTS website.

Two weeks after the discovery of NJCTS, I told my two best friends about my TS, OCD and tics. They were wonderful and understanding. It became so much easier to relax with them, since I did not have to worry about hiding my tics. I even slept at one of their houses that night!

In April 2010, my life really changed forever for the better. Continue reading

My new book: “Royal Tips on Standing Up To A Bully”

My name is Logan Kurtz, and I’m 18 years old. I have stepped forward onto a new project. The goal of this project is to publish a book that will give the caged innocent a way out though inspirational words and step-by-step instructions when facing a bully. This is the ultimate step-by-step guide to standing up to a bully!

“Royal Tips On Standing Up To A Bully” will be sold to raise money toward families of children who end up in hospitals because of bullying and cannot afford the costs. Get your copy here: www.RoyalTipSeries.com

Get yours now at www.RoyalTipSeries.com

Get your copy now!

Royal Tip Series will ship your package you when the book is officially published this summer.

A great book on living with tics, plus … my viewing party!

worlds-strongest-librarian-178x300Hi guys and gals, a friend of my mother’s from high school, Mr. Kent Anderson, works for an amazing publisher in New York City. He has been following my journey and was nice enough to send a GREAT book to me called “The World’s Strongest Librarian.”

It is such an inspiring, funny and real presentation of what we go through in our lives with our tics. I found this news story online and wanted to share it with you about the author. I hope you watch the video and read his book. I am halfway through and will finish it after my viewing party on Sunday.

Right now, it is a bit crazy getting ready for Sunday. I am looking forward to sharing my story with America, and I hope you tune into “The Kandi Factory” at 10 p.m. EST on Bravo TV if you cannot make the party.

In the meantime, keep your heads held high and take the time to do something nice for someone else in your day. Peace out, it’s pizza time!

My Youth Advocate speech

Hi everyone! I just wanted to drop by to post my speech from Sunday’s NJ Walks For TS at Ramapo College! It was an amazing time! I was delivering a speech there because I was being honored as the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome‘s Youth Advocate of the Year. I am so honored! So here is my speech. It pretty much says it all:

8657877241_aa7f88a432Good afternoon everyone, and on behalf of the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders, I want to welcome you to the NJ Walks For TS at Ramapo College! Thank you for coming out to the walk today! Your support for TS is amazing and appreciated!

I want to thank NJCTS very, very much for honoring me with this very prestigious award. I am flattered and thrilled beyond words. Now, I want to tell you a little about my experience with TS and how I ended up here today.

I was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder when I was 6 years old.  As I got older, I tried to control my “tics” because I was embarrassed and afraid someone would make fun of me. I would try to hold my tics in all day long while at school and couldn’t wait till I got home so I could tick all I wanted.  Similarly, I rarely went on playdates after school because I wanted to go home so I could tic, and I never went on sleepovers because of the same reasons.

I continued to try to hide the “real me” until my freshman year in high school, when my doctor suggested I tell a few close friends about my TS and OCD. She related it to diabetes – a problem that you cannot control. I was hesitant about the idea and not convinced that it was okay, normal, cool, or any combination of those words to have Tourette Syndrome — until my mother and I came across the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome website. Continue reading