Youth Co-Chair believes people won’t be sorry if they come to NJ Walks for TS at Princeton on March 29

NJ Walks for TS at Princeton is a 5K walk and family fun run on March 29. With a little more than 2 weeks to go, now is the best time to register and start getting in shape for spring.

“People won’t be sorry they came,” Youth Co-Chair Ethan Lederman said. “They’ll get exercise, meet some great people who have TS, and support this very important cause.”

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements or sounds known as tics. It often accompanied by other disorders including ADHD, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and learning disabilities. As many as 1 in 100 school children show symptoms of TS, which means there are more than 20,000 New Jersey children living with the disorder.

“It can be really, really difficult to live with TS, because you usually don’t just have TS but TS and a bunch of other disorders,” Ethan said. “It helps if you’ve known someone with TS because it’s hard to describe how it can affect your life and you might be more sympathetic about reminding people not to stare or assume you’re just a ‘bad kid.’ ”

Ethan met Tess and Paige Kowalski through the family retreat weekend program of the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome (NJCTS). Tess and Paige both have TS, and Tess is the teen responsible for bringing NJ Walks to the Princeton area.

“We’ve had a lot of the same struggles with TS,” Ethan said.

Ethan and the Kowalski’s also share an interest in educating the public about the disorder. Through the NJCTS Youth Advocate Program, the teens travel throughout the state meeting with political leaders, and delivering trainings to peers and healthcare professionals.

“This year, I got to speak to a state senator and Senator [Robert] Menendez’s staff on all the ways I’m very grateful to have NJCTS,” Ethan said. “TS isn’t something people talk about very much. I’m very proud to be part of the walk because I know it will be a good one. It is very important because it spreads awareness of TS, which not that many people really understand.”

Proceeds from NJ Walks for TS will benefit the Education Outreach Programs of NJCTS, which include youth leadership development, in-services for educators and students, hospital grand rounds presentations for healthcare professionals and scholarships for students with TS.

“NJ Walks for TS is a one-of-a-kind event for kids, by kids,” NJCTS Executive Director Faith W. Rice said. “Our Youth Co-Chair committee is working hard to spread the word and invite the public to join us in a celebration of awareness, advocacy and acceptance.”

With spring and warm weather around the corner, now is the time to prepare for one of the first 5Ks of the season, or simply a stroll with friends and family. Registration and donations can be made through www.njcts.org.

New Jersey teen wants to see more acceptance and education

NJ+Walks+for+TS+LOGO2Hallie Hoffman wants you to know that people with Tourette Syndrome (TS) are more than just their diagnosis.

“TS is just one group we belong to, just as people may identify themselves with other groups such as athletes or musicians,” she said, “TS is not a disorder that puts people at social odds with others, as it is sometimes portrayed in the media.”

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements or sounds known as tics. It is often accompanied by other disorders including ADHD, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and learning disabilities. As many as 1 in 100 school-age children show symptoms of TS, which means there are more than 20,000 New Jersey children living with the disorder. Hallie is one of them, and she joins other teens as Youth Co-Chairs for this year’s NJ Walks for TS at Princeton.

NJ Walks for TS is a 5K walk and family fun run at Mercer County Park on March 29 by the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome (NJCTS). The event raises awareness while breaking the stigma attached to the disorder.

“Our mission is one of acceptance and education, and we need the public’s help to accomplish this.” said Hallie.

To help is to attend the walk or donate. Proceeds from NJ Walks for TS will benefit the Education Outreach Programs of NJCTS, which include youth leadership development, in-services for educators and students, hospital grand rounds presentations for healthcare professionals and scholarships for students with TS.

Education is a very powerful tool in fighting the stigma attached to this disorder, and Hallie knows this well. Her interest in learning more about TS led her to invite a speaker to her school to talk about the disorder- before she even had a diagnosis.

“Even though I knew I had TS, my parents were afraid that if I got the diagnosis, I would be bullied by my peers,” Hallie said. ” It was my interest in educating others about TS that helped me confront my parents about getting a diagnosis, and shortly after I became trained as a Youth Advocate for NJCTS.”

Youth Advocates travel to schools and hospitals to train students and healthcare professionals about TS. Last summer, Hallie was in the first class of the Tim Howard NJCTS Leadership Academy.

“Young people with TS are a force, they are motivated and dedicated to helping their peers living with TS and other neurological disorders,” NJCTS Executive Director Faith W. Rice said. “NJ Walks for TS was founded for kids, by kids- and the work they are able to accomplish will help a new generation.”

Hallie is counting on the public to make this year’s event bigger than ever.

“Not only is [NJ Walks for TS] really fun, but it’s a great way to be a part of a larger goal,” she said. “A 5K may not seem that important, but the support shown and the money raised make a huge difference.”

Legacy of Princeton teen is growing with 2nd annual awareness event

NJ Walks for TS at Princeton returns to Mercer County on Sunday, March 29. The 5K walk/family fun run will take place at Mercer County Park (East Picnic Area) in West Windsor. The second annual walk is growing, and teen Tess Kowalski of Plainsboro is at the center of what promises to be a powerful day.

NJ Walks for TS originated in 2010 in Morris County, and last year the 15-year-old and her father, Tim, brought NJ Walks to the Princeton area. This year, she leads an impressive Honorary Committee and Youth Co-Chairs.

This year’s Honorary Committee will be co-chaired by District 14 Senator Linda Greenstein and Assemblyman Daniel Benson. They are joined by District 7 Senator Dianne B. Allen and Assemblyman Herb Conaway, Jr., and Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert. This list is expected to grow.

“Their support means so much to NJCTS and the 20,000 kids with Tourette Syndrome in New Jersey,” NJCTS Executive Director Faith W. Rice said.

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary vocal or muscle movements known as tics. TS is frequently accompanied by ADHD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, depression or learning disorders. As many as 1 in 100 people show signs of TS, however, the disorder remains misunderstood and misdiagnosed in the medical community. Proceeds from NJ Walks will benefit the Education Outreach Programs of NJCTS which train health-care professionals, educators and students across the state.

“Each dollar will make a difference in helping us improve diagnosis, treatment and life for kids with TS and their families,” Rice said. “We are also working in schools to spread an effective anti-bullying message of awareness and acceptance that benefits all students and training a new generation of youth leaders, but we can’t do it without support.”

“You don’t have to know about it [TS] to walk,” but should, said Tess, “because it feels good, it’s a nice thing to do.”

Just like the Honorary Committee, the NJ Walks for TS at Princeton Youth Co-Chairs are also spreading the word. In addition to Tess, the Youth Co-chairs include, Ethan Lederman of Howell, Hallie Hoffman of Belle Mead, and Anna Heicklen of Medford Lakes.

Register for the walk here, and donate for the walk here. For more information, please visit www.njcts.org.

Haddon Township (N.J.) High School students learn about Tourette Syndrome

Faculty members of Haddon Township High School and student members of the school’s Psychology Club devoted time on February 2 to learn about Tourette Syndrome.

Known also as TS, Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by uncontrollable sounds and movements known as tics. Even though as many as 1 in 100 Americans show symptoms of the disorder, it’s still frequently misdiagnosed and misunderstood.

The New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome and Associated Disorders (NJCTS) Education Outreach Program offers school in-service presentations for faculty and students. For educators, the focus is on identifying and accommodating students with TS and its co-occurring disorders including ADHD, OCD, depression and anxiety. Students are given a lesson in acceptance, anti-bullying and empowerment.

NJCTS Executive Director Faith W. Rice is grateful for the invitations to present at schools throughout the state. “Awareness and training go a long way in creating understanding of Tourette Syndrome and compassion for those who are living with it,” she said.

“Even if a teacher or classmate hasn’t met a student with TS yet, chances are likely that they soon will,” added Rice. “Our presentations are taking away the stigma of this disorder, and by doing we’re making schools a safer place for kids with TS and other neurological disorders.”

NJCTS School In-Service presentations are delivered by master’s level educators with (often personal) experience assisting students with Tourette Syndrome. For more information about the Education Outreach Program, or how to arrange a presentation for your school or club, visit www.njcts.org or call 908-575-7350.

I SAID YES!

Last night the guy I have been going on dates with asked me if I would like to go out with him officially. I said yes! :)

So now I can say that we’re officially going out and that for now I am no longer single. I like so much about him. I really like how open he is with me and that he is not afraid to show me who he truly is. I also really like his personality in general and how he is a really great conversationalist.

We always have something to talk about and it’s always engaging and thought provoking to be around him. I like that he wants to spend time getting to know me and he really seems to like me. He gives me so many complements and tells me how cute I am, how much he likes spending time with me, and how happy he is that he met me.

Today he opened up to me about some things that were more on the personal side, and even though I was hesitant to, I opened up to him more too. I told me that I have sensory issues and OCD traits. He seemed really OK with it and didn’t seem to think much of it at all. It didn’t seem to affect how he feels about me and after I told him that he asked me to get ice cream later tonight and hang out more.

This gives me more confidence that if I told him about my tics, it wouldn’t affect how he feels about me either. There is still that nagging thought in the back of my head though, that fear that he will not accept me. I know it’s just the fear that has been instilled in me by my parents that is making me feel this way. I know intellectually that he probably won’t reject me because of my tics. The fear and the emotion is so real though. I think at this point I just have to take a leap of faith and plunge off the diving board. I think the sooner I make the leap, the easier it will be to be myself around him.

I’m not sure when exactly i’m going to take that leap and tell him, but I am hoping I will have the courage to do it soon, maybe even tonight when we get ice cream together. I plan on telling him in a very casual way and not making a big deal about it. I’ll keep you guys updated on what I decide to do! Please wish me luck! :)